• Doing the right thing is prosperous for everyone.

recycling

BOPA Event in Dallas - Recycling Batteries Oil Paint Antifreeze

Set Your Calendar for the November BOPA Event in Dallas

As the Dallas Sanitation Services department tells us, there are some things that simply can’t be thrown away in the trash or recycled at municipal recycling centers or paying recycling facilities like Encore Recyclers. This material is important to dispose of properly—but it’s also dangerous and difficult to work withHowever, there is a solution! The city of Garland, the city of Dallas, and Encore are all concerned with the health of our community and our environment, so we thought we’d let you know about an upcoming opportunity to dispose of some of your hazardous materials ethically and responsibly. The city of Dallas puts on BOPA collection events a few times every year, and the next one is coming right up on November 11th. Mark your calendars—it’s time to do some good in the community by getting rid of these materials the right way.

What is all this BOPA stuff, anyway?

BOPA stands for Batteries, Oil, Paint, and Antifreeze. These are fairly common materials that many Dallas residents have, but cannot be disposed of safely through the city’s usual trash collection system.

On November 11th, though, residents of Dallas County—which includes most Garland residents—may bring their BOPA materials to the BOPA Mobile, which will be at 5639 Forest Lane. Waste collection will happen on this day between 8am and 11am.

Be sure to note that BOPA includes oil filters as well as liquid oil. Oil filters are also dangerous to throw in the regular trash—but they can also be picked up for free at this upcoming collection event!

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Start Recycling Scrap Metal - Dallas, TX

Start Recycling Scrap Metal: Scrapping 101

So you want to start recycling scrap metal for extra money? This can be a lucrative venture, and many of our customers here at Encore also consider it a fun hobby. The best way to get the most out of scrap metal recycling is to understand a bit about the process before you start recycling metal, so here’s a quick primer just for you.

What to Look for When You Start Recycling Scrap Metal

Almost any scrap metal is worth something, but different metals bring different amounts of money. Aluminum and copper are particularly profitable for many of our regular customers, as these materials are used in a wide variety of manufacturing processes. Steel is not worth as much per pound, but is very easy to find virtually anywhere.

Before throwing out any car parts, electrical or plumbing components, or electronics like computers and cell phones, try bringing them by our facility. If you own a business that produces a lot of scrap metal, you may want to make regular visits to our facility or learn about our free recycling container pickup and dropoff program.

Even if you don’t own a business, you may be able to make extra money by offering to help clean up construction sites and take scrap metal—just be sure to get explicit permission from the site owner or construction company, in writing if possible.

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Selling Insulated Copper Wire Scrap for the Highest Price in Dallas, TX

Should You Burn Your Copper Wire to Earn More Money For Scrap?

Spoiler alert: NO!

We saw a disturbing video of a man advocating the burning of insulated copper wire, purportedly to qualify the wire as Copper #2, which brings a higher sale value when sold as scrap than insulated wire. Please don’t do this.

Burning insulated wire in Texas is ILLEGAL under the federal Clean Air Act.

Burning copper wire is not a safe way to release the copper inside it. Burning copper wire releases carcinogens and toxins into the air and into the ground around the burn site, including “dioxins, furans, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, particulate matter, heavy metals (such as lead, arsenic, selenium and cadmium) and other pollutants.”

You might wonder how burning copper wire yourself is different from the industrial process used to reclaim copper from insulated wire. It’s true that heat is also used to strip copper wire in a commercial setting. There is a big difference between holding copper wire over a flame, as an amateur might do, and a factory that uses the intense heat of an industrial incinerator and appropriate venting procedures. Burning insulated copper wire yourself releases toxins that can damage your nervous system, respiratory system, and cardiovascular system, not to mention increasing your risk of cancer.

Fines and punishment for not following this code are steep. You could face fines in the tens of thousands of dollars or even jail time. If someone should catch you burning insulated wire, they can report you for a reward.

This blog post from Scrap Metal Junkie breaks down the foolishness of burning copper wire for economic purposes.

Say for example that #1 copper scrap is worth 2.60 per pound, scrap insulated wire is worth $1.20 per pound, and burned wire is worth $2.20 per pound… For a pile of wire that weighs under 100 lbs, there is NO reason to burn it.

If you burned 100 lbs of insulated copper wire copper wire, and you end up with less than 60 pounds of burned copper, then that means you have broken even…(When you burn copper wire, it loses about half its weight, depending on the type of wire.)

On the other hand, if you were to strip the same wire, you would make at least $31!

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Best prices for aluminum cans and scrap metal - Dallas, TX

Recycling Aluminum Cans

Did you know that aluminum used to be considered such a rare and precious commodity that Napoleon Bonaparte’s nephew, had a rattle and other toys made of aluminum, as a status symbol? Even though aluminum is the third most abundant element in the Earth’s crust, at the time it was extremely difficult to produce. In fact, aluminum was selected as the material to use for the 100-ounce capstone of the Washington Monument in 1884, a time when one ounce cost the daily wage of a common worker on the project. The capstone, which was set in place on December 6, 1884, was the largest single piece of cast aluminum  at the time.

When you think of recycling, aluminum cans are often the first item to come to mind. It makes sense, since aluminum cans are perhaps the most sustainable beverage container available. Not only are they extremely lightweight and easily stacked (try stacking glass bottles!) for efficiency in transport, but they are easily reclaimed. According to the Aluminum Association, approximately 70% of every aluminum consists of recycled aluminum.

Here are some additional facts about aluminum cans that you might not have known:

  • More than 50 percent of the aluminum cans produced is recycled.
  • A used aluminum can is recycled and back on the grocery shelf as a new can in as little as 60 days.
  • Every minute, an average of 113,204 aluminum cans are recycled.
  • Recycling one aluminum can saves enough energy to keep a 100-watt bulb burning for almost four hours or run your television for three hours.
  • Tossing away an aluminum can wastes as much energy as pouring out half of that can’s volume of gasoline.
  • Aluminum is a durable and sustainable metal: Two-thirds of the aluminum ever produced is still in use today.

Other types of aluminum, such as siding, gutters, car components, storm window frames, and lawn furniture can also be recycled.

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